Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between A Point Mutation And A Silent Mutation?

​Point Mutation

A point mutation is when a single base pair is altered.

First, the base substitution can be a silent mutation where the altered codon corresponds to the same amino acid.

Second, the base substitution can be a missense mutation where the altered codon corresponds to a different amino acid.

What type of mutation is point mutation?

A point mutation or substitution is a genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base is changed, inserted or deleted from a sequence of DNA or RNA. Point mutations have a variety of effects on the downstream protein product—consequences that are moderately predictable based upon the specifics of the mutation.

What are the 3 types of point mutations?

There are three types of DNA Mutations: base substitutions, deletions and insertions. Single base substitutions are called point mutations, recall the point mutation Glu —–> Val which causes sickle-cell disease.

Is a deletion a point mutation?

Insertion and Deletion

A deletion mutation is the opposite; it occurs when a base pair is deleted from a sequence. These two types of point mutations are grouped together because both of them can drastically affect the sequence of amino acids produced.

What is an example of a silent mutation?

Silent mutations are base substitutions that result in no change of the amino acid or amino acid functionality when the altered messenger RNA (mRNA) is translated. For example, if the codon AAA is altered to become AAG, the same amino acid – lysine – will be incorporated into the peptide chain.