Quick Answer: What Is Direct And Circumstantial Evidence?

Quick Answer: What Is Direct And Circumstantial Evidence?

Circumstantial evidence is evidence that relies on an inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact—such as a fingerprint at the scene of a crime.

By contrast, direct evidence supports the truth of an assertion directly—i.e., without need for any additional evidence or inference.

What is the difference between direct and circumstantial evidence?

When a witness, such as an eyewitness, asserts actual knowledge of a fact, that witness’ testimony is direct evidence. On the other hand, evidence of facts and circumstances from which reasonable inferences may be drawn is circumstantial evidence.

Which is an example of direct evidence?

Direct evidence supports the truth of an assertion (in criminal law, an assertion of guilt or of innocence) directly, i.e., without an intervening inference. For example: a witness who testifies that he saw the defendant shoot the victim gives direct evidence.

What is circumstantial evidence example?

A court would be very slow to convict a defendant based on one piece of circumstantial evidence, for example, if the defendant’s fingerprints were found at the scene of the crime but there was no other evidence.

What are the two types of circumstantial evidence?

There are two types of evidence; namely, direct evidence and circumstantial evidence. In this case, the People contend that there is circumstantial evidence of the defendant’s guilt.

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