Quick Answer: What Does Photophobia Look Like?

Photophobia typically causes a need to squint or close the eyes, and headache, nausea, or other symptoms may be associated with photophobia.

Symptoms may be worse with bright light.

Does photophobia go away?

This light sensitivity is often referred to as photophobia by medical professionals, and, for many, it can go away quickly. But for others, photophobia can be a persistent symptom of a diagnosed medical condition such as migraine, post-concussion syndrome or dry eye.

What causes photophobia?

Other common causes of photophobia include corneal abrasion, uveitis and a central nervous system disorder such as meningitis. Light sensitivity also is associated with a detached retina, contact lens irritations, sunburn and refractive surgery.

Why are my eyes so sensitive to light all of a sudden?

A sudden onset of substantial or even painful light sensitivity (photophobia) may be caused by inflammation in the eye. This may be due to a foreign body in the eye, an infection of the cornea or an inflammation of the iris or uvea. Light sensitivity can also occur after having LASIK or cataract surgery.

How common is photophobia?

Photophobia is linked to the connection between cells in your eyes that detect light and a nerve that goes to your head. Migraines are the most common cause of light sensitivity. Up to 80% of people who get them have photophobia along with their headaches.